The Supreme Court rules on marriage equality

WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 25: A gay marriage waves a flag in front of the Supreme Court Building June 25, 2015 in Washington, DC. The high court is expected rule in the next few days on whether states can prohibit same sex marriage, as 13 states currently do.   (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON, DC – JUNE 25: A gay marriage waves a flag in front of the Supreme Court Building June 25, 2015 in Washington, DC. The high court is expected rule in the next few days on whether states can prohibit same sex marriage, as 13 states currently do. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

 

UPDATE: On June 26th the Supreme Court ruled that same-sex marriage is a right guaranteed by the Constitution. The vote was 5 to 4 with justices Kennedy, Sotomayor, Ginsberg, Kagan and Breyer   forming the majority opinion. Justices Scalia, Roberts, Thomas and Alito were in the minority.

In the decision Justice Kennedy noted four principles and traditions of marriage that support marriage equality: the right to personal choice, supporting a two-person union, safeguarding family and children and that marriage is a keystone of social order.

 

 

Jim Obergefell, left, and John Arthur, who suffered from ALS, are married by officiant Paulette Roberts, Arthur’s aunt, on a plane on the tarmac at Baltimore-Washington International Marshall Airport on July 11, 2013. (Glenn Hartong/AP)

Jim Obergefell, left, and John Arthur, who suffered from ALS, are married by officiant Paulette Roberts, Arthur’s aunt, on a plane on the tarmac at Baltimore-Washington International Marshall Airport on July 11, 2013. (Glenn Hartong/AP)

 

ORIGINAL POST: Sometime in June, which is LGBT Awareness Month, the U.S. Supreme Court will pass down a ruling on cases relating to marriage equality.

Obergefell v Hodges, (Richard Hodges, Ohio Department of Health) is the umbrella title for four separated cases the court hearing which have been banded together to represent marriage rights.

Jim Obergefell is the plaintiff in the case for which the group is named. In 2013 his partner, John Arthur, was diagnosed with ALS and became terminally ill. Their home state of Ohio had passed an anti-LGBT constitutional amendment on marriage and the hospital would not list Obergefell as the surviving spouse on Arthur’s death certificate.

The couple flew to Baltimore in a special medical plane and were married on the tarmac at the airport.

Arthur died in October of 2013 and Obergefell was listed on the death certificate but Ohio’s Attorney General took the case to defend the amendment. An appeals court sided for the state and the case was sent to the Supreme Court.

Currently, same-sex marriage is legal in 37 states, including Connecticut, and the District of Columbia.

Many expect the Supreme Court to rule in favor of same-sex marriage rights.